B2B messages are often difficult to communicate briefly. And since social media is a relatively new adoption for B2B companies, it’s no wonder our Twitter feeds are laden with corporate gobbledygook, hard-to-read hash tags and long, ugly links.

If your brand’s Tweets aren’t clear and concise, very few people will understand and share your message. Here are some tips on cleaning up your B2B Tweets to increase viewers and improve your audience engagement.

Keep it brief:

Twitter displays 140 characters per Tweet, but that doesn’t mean you should use every single one. If you want your message to be read, liked and shared, make it easy for people to do so. This means leaving room for users to add “RT @YourHandle” before the message. According to a survey by Compendium, the ideal B2B Tweet length is 11-15 words.

Shorten your links:

Sure, it works to just copy and paste a URL right into your Tweet, but think of all of that wasted content real estate. Free URL shorteners like bitly and ow.ly not only keep your links looking clean, they help organize them for future use and even provide click stats so you know which content performs well.

Use fewer, more effective hash tags:

Hash tags help your content get discovered on Twitter, but when used excessively, they disrupt the flow of your Tweet. Stick with two tags maximum, and remember to tag for your audience – not your company. So, instead of tagging your brand or product name, tag the market or industry that your product is serving, such as #adhesives or #foodsafety.

Always provide more:

A Tweet itself is just a vehicle to get your brand’s content into the marketplace. A well-crafted Tweet will grab your audience’s attention – but then what? Use creative calls to action and links to guide readers to your website, a free download, an article or a compelling image or video. High-quality content will get shared, leading to more views, more followers and more prospects entering your sales funnel.

Have something to add? Please leave a comment or connect with us on Twitter @Schubert_b2b.

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